IAOOS

IAOOS – Ice Atmosphere Arctic Ocean Observing System

FEBRUARY 2011 – DECEMBER 2019

The IAOOS Project’s objective is to develop and maintain an automated observation network of ice-tethered platforms across the Arctic Ocean which will simultaneously and independently transmit via satellite, in near real time, the state of the ocean, sea ice and the lower atmosphere.

The project uses a CIMEL microlidar to monitor the atmosphere (T, conso, f optical window).

IAOOS project

The IAOOS equipment is based on 15 autonomous platforms working at any time in the Arctic Ocean, for a period of 7 years. Every platform, made up of 3 elements ocean / atmosphere / sea ice, drifts with the sea ice, the surface winds and the oceanic currents. They are designed to stay at the sea-ice surface and float on the surface of the ocean, with an autonomy of 2 years.

The IAOOS project plans the deployment of 6 platforms per year, following the plan of deployment of the first 15 platforms. Two periods of deployments are planned every year: in spring and in autumn.

Project
Observing, understanding and quantifying climate changes in the Arctic. IAOOS is specifically concerned with the potential for a significantly reduced sea ice cover, and the impacts this might have on the environment and on human activities, both regionally and globally.

Objectives

  • Deploy and maintain an integrated observing system providing simultaneous observations of the ocean, ice and lower atmosphere in real time in the Arctic
  • Complementary to satellite observations
  • Better understanding of interactions
  • Feed operational models
  • Improve predicting capabilities

Equipment on the IAOOS Platforms

  • CTD vertical profilers from 0 to 1000 m depth (conductivity, temperature, depth)
  • Ice Mass Balance (IMB)
  • Temperature and pressure sensors
  • CIMEL microlidars: T, conso, f optical window for atmosphere monitoring
  • Optical depth sensors (ODS)

Partners

IAOOS platform

References

  • Vincent Mariage, Jacques Pelon, Frédéric Blouzon, Stéphane Victori. IAOOS microlidar development and firsts results obtained during 2014 and 2015 arctic drifts . EPJ Web of Conferences, EDP Sciences, 2016, The 27th International Laser Radar Conference (IRLC 27), 119, 02005 (4 p.)(https://hal-insu.archives-ouvertes.fr/insu-01175931)
  • Vincent Mariage, Jacques Pelon, Frédéric Blouzon, Stéphane Victori, Nicolas Geyskens, Nadir Amarouche, Christine Drezen, Antoine Guillot, Michel Calzas, Magali Garracio, Nicolas Wegmuller, Nathalie Sennéchael, and Christine Provost, “IAOOS microlidar-on-buoy development and first atmospheric observations obtained during 2014 and 2015 arctic drifts,” Opt. Express 25, A73-A84 (2017) (https://doi.org/10.1364/OE.25.000A73)
  • Vincent Mariage. Développement et mise en oeuvre de LiDAR embarqués sur bouées dérivantes pour l’étude des propriétés des aérosols et des nuages en Arctique et des forçages radiatifs induits. Physique Atmosphérique et Océanique [physics.ao-ph]. Université Pierre et Marie Curie – Paris VI, 2015. Français. NNT : 2015PA066580

FIREX – AQ Mission

FIREX-AQ

FIREX – AQ Mission

Approximately half of fire emissions in the US are from Northwestern wildfires and half are from prescribed fires that burn mostly in the Southeast US. Wildfires burn slightly more fuel and therefore have overall larger emissions, but prescribed fires dominate the area burned and the number of fires. FIREX-AQ will investigate both wild and prescribed fires. Wildfires generally result in exposures with larger pollution concentrations over larger areas, and cause both local and regional air quality impacts. Their emissions are often transported thousands of miles and can impact large regions of the US at a time. Prescribed fires are usually smaller and less intense than most wildfires but occur more frequently and throughout the whole year. They are usually ignited during periods that minimize population expose and air quality impacts, but can cause regional backgrounds to increase, are generally in closer proximity to populations, and are responsible for a large fraction of the US PM2.5 emissions.

This summer, NOAA and NASA are teaming up on a massive research campaign called FIREX-AQ that will use satellites, aircraft, drones, mobile and ground stations to study smoke from wildfires and agricultural crop fires across the U.S. 

Objective: To improve understanding of wildfire and agricultural fire impacts on air quality, weather, and climate.

Cimel provides a CE376 micro-LiDAR as well as its network of CE318-T photometers through AERONET. These solutions will provide detailed measurements of aerosols emitted from wildfires and agricultural fires to address science topics and evaluate impacts on local and regional air quality, and how satellite data can be used to estimate emissions more accurately.

The Primary Mission Partners are:

COBIACC campaign

COBIACC campaign

Is the rural atmosphere better than elsewhere?

For the entire month of July in Caillouël-Crépigny (France), scientists from the University of Lille and ATMO Hauts-de-France will analyze particles in the air and their impact on health in rural areas.

Since 28 June, more than twenty air pollution measuring devices deployed over 100 m² in the commune of Caillouël-Crépigny (02) may answer this question.

Objectives: To understand the formation and the composition of particles and their precursors in the air in a rural environment during the summer period.

The sensors collect dust from the countryside and nearby dust from forests, roads, buildings and industries in the distance.

The facility consists of four containers installed on 100 m² in the village square of Caillouël-Crépigny. They accommodate twenty-two observation instruments including our Cimel Sun Sky Lunar CE318-T photometer as well as our CE376 micro-LiDAR. These instruments, unique in France, measure the impact of climate change on air quality, biodiversity and health. Thirty researchers take turns night and day to study the chemical modifications of particles during periods of high heat.

This campaign was named COBIACC for Campagne d’OBservation Intensive des Aérosols et précurseurs à Caillouël-Crépigny. It is the result of a partnership between Labex CaPPA, a laboratory of excellence in Lille, CPER Climibio, an environmental project involving 16 laboratories in the Hauts-de-France and Atmo Hauts-de-France, the regional air quality observatory.

Laboratories involved:

NASA AERONET

satellite-cimel

NASA AERONET

Aerosols, these tiny particles of the lower atmosphere, are one important component of atmosphere affecting climate (radiative effects, water cycle) and air quality.

For characterizing and monitoring aerosols, water wapor and clouds, LOA and Cimel, in collaboration with NASA’s GSFC, developed the robotic solar photometer for the AERONET network in the early 1990s. The meeting between CNRS and NASA researchers and the industrial company Cimel led to the definition of an automatic, robust, autonomous solar photometer that transmits its data by radio, providing AOD and particle size in real time. In 1998, the French component (PHOTONS) was awarded the INSU Observation Service label.

Cimel is NASA – AERONET’s exclusive supplier of automatic Sun Sky Lunar photometers (CIMEL CE318-T) operating in near real time and providing aerosol optical and columnar microphysical properties.